stormingtheivory:

change.org just sent me a petition to demand that the US name a warship after Harvey Milk and if that isn’t the most succinct example of the way queer advocacy has been coopted by neoliberalism and the military-industrial complex, bless me I don’t know what is.

(via neutroisenjolras)

kellez69:

khaipie:

What is it about The Capital in The Hunger Games that is so wrong?

Is it the killing of innocent children?

Is it the oppression of the districts?

Is it the media censorship?

Is it the attacks on peaceful protesters? 

Is it the denial of basic human rights?

Does any of this sound familiar?

If it’s clear in fiction why is it so hard to see that what’s happening in Ferguson is so wrong?

This.

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

Help a QTPOC stay in their Dream School!


therealizationofme:

Hello! My name is Rhapsody and I was once a student at the University of Colorado Boulder. I had to leave because of lack of funding and I’ve been working for two years to get back into school.

A little about me, I am a 21 year old Biracial, Queer, Agender individual who has been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I got involved in the activist scene three years ago and since then I’ve become a leader in our local community. I’m one of the leaders of our local Queer and Trans People of Color chapter and helped put on multiple events. I’ve also been a guest Professor in multiple classes, spoken on the radio, and helped bring stars such as Janet Mock and Sister Outsider to campus.

I only have one bill to pay before I can go back to school. Any donation is much appreciated and I would totally do a Promo for you. If you can’t donate please share with all of your followers.

Thank you so much!
Rhapsody

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

serkets:

itsgayerinenochian:

creepyjirachi:

"you can’t be just friends with people of the gender you’re attracted to"
myth actually true. i, as a bisexual, can confirm that i have no friends.

pansexuals spend their lives in solitude, with only rocks for company

meanwhile asexuals are friends with everyone. literally every single person on the planet. i do not know how i remember so many names

(via fuckyeahhardfemme)

johnkatier:

dude god could come down from heaven with a million angels and tell me that gif is pronounced “jif” and i still wouldn’t fucking do it

(Source: kosukeueki, via aliceinpunderland)

tahthetrickster:

image

i cant believe this

(Source: ellendegeneres, via trixibelle)

Reminder: You are under no obligation to look pretty.


cheeky-geek-m0nkey:

fandomsandfeminism:

Not when you are laying around the house, not when you go to the grocery store, not when you sit in a classroom, not when you go to the gym. You are never obligated to get dressed up just so you are pretty for others.

Pretty is not the rent you pay to exist in the world as a woman. 

That last line. Wow.

(via bio-mechanic)

dynastylnoire:

teethvsteeth:

White people really out here acting like damn fools.

I heard about this yesterday and I’ll at a loss as to why white people feel the need to co-opt the oppression of black people for white causes. 
It is insulting and blatant racist to state that a choice to get ink injected in your body knowing what ramification may come is somehow similar to the discrimination that black people receive for being born black.
Black babies, children, and teens experience racism  with out a permission slip from their parent to get it.
There are no classes one can take to inject blackness into the skin
You can’t pay someone to lazer away blackness. You can’t cover it up for a job interview.
You can’t be temporarily black for the weekend or fair or special event though we know white folks try to with results that are hilarious as they are an act of minstrelsy. 
STOP SAYING THIS SHIT people are dying for being black. The police aren’t locking down your city because a bunch of white people with tattoos live there.
And are we just going to ignore that black people get tattoo’s as well and are vilified for it?
Fuck whoever made this meme

dynastylnoire:

teethvsteeth:

White people really out here acting like damn fools.

I heard about this yesterday and I’ll at a loss as to why white people feel the need to co-opt the oppression of black people for white causes.

It is insulting and blatant racist to state that a choice to get ink injected in your body knowing what ramification may come is somehow similar to the discrimination that black people receive for being born black.

Black babies, children, and teens experience racism  with out a permission slip from their parent to get it.

There are no classes one can take to inject blackness into the skin

You can’t pay someone to lazer away blackness. You can’t cover it up for a job interview.

You can’t be temporarily black for the weekend or fair or special event though we know white folks try to with results that are hilarious as they are an act of minstrelsy.

STOP SAYING THIS SHIT people are dying for being black. The police aren’t locking down your city because a bunch of white people with tattoos live there.

And are we just going to ignore that black people get tattoo’s as well and are vilified for it?

Fuck whoever made this meme

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

desdeotromar:

sufferingsappho:

My entire check this month is gonna be gone in like two days. Like, I’m not even gonna have money for food this month. Fuck me

For everyone who wants to help trans women of color. For everyone who wants to protect black trans women.

sufferingsappho (a black trans girl) is in great need and is asking for donations to her paypal. If you can spare any cash, go to her page and hit the donate button. If not, please reblog this post.

(via soychorizo)

dopenmind:

Why is it that culture is only innovative and worth discussing before a grand audience after it has been appropriated? Remember that article about the science of twerking? When I was a kid Black girls were being told they were “fast” for twerking at recess. Miley Cyrus does it on MTV and now it’s some marvellous thing they need to dissect and understand. This Christopher Columbus approach is such a problem. Recently VOGUE published an article about big butts being trendy. Remember when they sacrificed Sarah Baartman (and other African women) for science? Her body was considered abnormal and was therefore put on display as a paid attraction. She was considered wild and savage-like for her features, and even after death her body parts were still for public consumption. There are many hardships associated with being a Black woman, but I find erasure to be one of the toughest parts. Our bodies are not trends. (And not just Black bodies, bodies in general are not trends.) The same things they shun us for, the same things they call ghetto, unacceptable, disgusting, savage-like, unfit, insubordinate are brand new and cool now that they can be Whiter. And sure, they mentioned a few obligatory Black women but not in depth, not historically, and essentially not without sexualization. We’re discouraged from being openly sexual but our prowess is duplicated and profited from across the globe. Why is it that we’re never invited to the table of discussion? Why is it that our flesh is only worthy soaked in bleach?

#vogue #voguearticles #voguemagazine #culturalappropriation #blackwomen #africanamerican #blackfeminism #jenniferlopez #jlo #sarahbaartman #bigbutt #booty #butt #bodypolicing #bodypolitics #theinnocentwoman

dopenmind:

Why is it that culture is only innovative and worth discussing before a grand audience after it has been appropriated? Remember that article about the science of twerking? When I was a kid Black girls were being told they were “fast” for twerking at recess. Miley Cyrus does it on MTV and now it’s some marvellous thing they need to dissect and understand. This Christopher Columbus approach is such a problem. Recently VOGUE published an article about big butts being trendy. Remember when they sacrificed Sarah Baartman (and other African women) for science? Her body was considered abnormal and was therefore put on display as a paid attraction. She was considered wild and savage-like for her features, and even after death her body parts were still for public consumption. There are many hardships associated with being a Black woman, but I find erasure to be one of the toughest parts. Our bodies are not trends. (And not just Black bodies, bodies in general are not trends.) The same things they shun us for, the same things they call ghetto, unacceptable, disgusting, savage-like, unfit, insubordinate are brand new and cool now that they can be Whiter. And sure, they mentioned a few obligatory Black women but not in depth, not historically, and essentially not without sexualization. We’re discouraged from being openly sexual but our prowess is duplicated and profited from across the globe. Why is it that we’re never invited to the table of discussion? Why is it that our flesh is only worthy soaked in bleach?

#vogue #voguearticles #voguemagazine #culturalappropriation #blackwomen #africanamerican #blackfeminism #jenniferlopez #jlo #sarahbaartman #bigbutt #booty #butt #bodypolicing #bodypolitics #theinnocentwoman

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

2creepychihuahuas:

illbeyourfavouritedrug:

heathyr:

partybarackisinthehousetonight:

my life changed forever when i found out the word “slang” was actually slang for “shortened language”

image

so slang is slang for slang

image

(via hueva-york)

gradientlair:

My humanity is not debatable.

gradientlair:

My humanity is not debatable.

(via hueva-york)